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Strength and power training are popular among athletes and fitness enthusiasts looking to improve their athletic performance and overall health. One popular method of training is velocity-based training (VBT), which involves using a device to measure the velocity of a movement and adjust the load accordingly. This allows for a more personalized training experience and can help athletes maximize their results. In this blog post, we'll explore the research on VBT and its effects on maximal strength, power, and velocity.

INTRODUCTION

Maximal strength is the amount of force a muscle or group of muscles can generate during a maximal effort. This is an important factor for athletes who need to be able to produce high levels of force, such as powerlifters, weightlifters, and football players. The first study we'll look at, published in the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, examined the effects of VBT on maximal strength in trained athletes (1). The study found that athletes who trained with VBT had greater improvements in maximal strength compared to those who trained with traditional methods. The authors suggest that this is because VBT allows for more precise load adjustments and ensures that athletes are lifting at their optimal velocity.

Another study published in the European Journal of Applied Physiology found similar results in untrained individuals (2). The study found that participants who trained with VBT had greater improvements in maximal strength compared to those who trained with traditional methods. The authors suggest that VBT may be particularly beneficial for novice lifters, as it allows for a more gradual increase in load and reduces the risk of injury.

INTRODUCTION

Power is the rate at which work is done, or the amount of force generated per unit of time. This is an important factor for athletes who need to be explosive, such as sprinters, jumpers, and martial artists. The first study we'll look at, published in the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, examined the effects of VBT on power in trained athletes (1). The study found that athletes who trained with VBT had greater improvements in power compared to those who trained with traditional methods. The authors suggest that this is because VBT allows for more precise load adjustments and ensures that athletes are lifting at their optimal velocity, which may be particularly important for power development.

Another study published in the European Journal of Applied Physiology found similar results in recreational athletes (3). The study found that participants who trained with VBT had greater improvements in power compared to those who trained with traditional methods. The authors suggest that VBT may be particularly beneficial for athletes who need to be explosive, as it allows for a more individualized training experience and may improve the athlete's ability to produce force quickly.